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The Science of Singing

Who Knew Singing Was

So Powerful?

SingFit knows! A growing body of research proves regular singing has wide-ranging health benefits, providing a full-brain, bihemispheric workout for increased brain plasticity, positively regulating cortisol, dopamine, and endorphins to elevate mood and reduce pain, all while increasing oxygenation, essentially providing energy that fuels virtually every bodily system.

Socialization

Full Brain Workout

Neurochemical Release

Respiratory Benefits

Immunity Fortitude

New Technlology for Studying the Impact of Regular Singing and Song Learning on Cognitive Function in Older Adults: A Feasibility Study

TUFTS UNIVERSITY | 2017 | Psychomusicology: Music, Mind, and Brain, 27(2), 132-144. | Reid, A. G., Rakhilin, M., Patel, A. D., Urry, H. L., & Thomas, A. K.

SingFit is a valid tool that makes the research process much easier and less expensive than traditional music training studies and fits into a larger literature examining how singing can influence wellbeing across the life span.

Singing as an Intervention for Dementia Provides More Benefits Than Music Listening

THE GUARDIAN | Published Nov 11, 2013 | Study appears in the Journal of American Geriatric Society 63(4):815-6. 

A four-month study at George Mason University shows that while passive music listening provides some therapeutic benefits for people with dementia, active singing produces better results in terms of improvements in memory, cogitation, and mood.

Music Interventions for Preoperative Anxiety

COCHRANE ANAESTHESIA GROUP | 2013 | Cochrane review, by The Cochrane Collaboration in The Cochrane Library, Issue 6

The review included 26 trials with a total of 2051 participants and concludes that music interventions may provide a viable alternative to sedatives and anti-anxiety drugs for reducing preoperative anxiety.

The Therapeutic Effects of Singing in Neurological Disorders

JOURNAL: MUSIC PERCEPTION | 2010 | Vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 287-295. Wan, C.Y., Ruber, T., Hohmann, A., Schlaug, G. 

Evaluates existing reserach on the use of active music making (i.e., singing) as a therapeutic mechanism to ameliorate language deficits and overall brain functionality and plasticity in conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, Aphasiia and Autism. 

Apollo’s Gift: New Aspects of Neurologic Music Therapy

PROGRESS IN BRAIN RESEARCH | February 2011 | Altenmuller, E. & Schlaug, G. (2015). 

Reviews plastic changes in the brain in response to music listening and music making activities and the potential of using music to support and facilitate neurorehabilitation.

Music as an Aid for Postoperative Recovery in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

THE LANCET | August 2015 | The Lancet 386(10004) DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60169-6

This most comprehensive review of the evidence so far involves almost 7000 patients and finds that listening to music before, during, or after a surgical procedure can significantly reduce pain and anxiety, and decrease the need for pain medication.